Synbio-legal scholar publishes on IPRs and Standardization in Biotech Journal – University of Copenhagen

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17 October 2016

Synbio-legal scholar publishes on IPRs and Standardization in Biotech Journal

NEW publication

Center for Synbio legal scholar Professor Timo Minssen paves the way for interdisciplinary publications with a forthcoming article on IPRs and Standardization in Systems Biology. This is his second co-authored paper in Biotechnology Journal. With previous publications in Nature Biotech, PLoS Computational Biology and Perzonalized Medicine, he is among the very few legal scholars in Europe that recurrently publish in typical "wet science" journals.

Title: Standards, Data Exchange and Intellectual Property Rights in Systems Biology
by Esther van Zimmeren, Berthold Rutz and Timo Minssen.
Biotechnology Journal, in press - 13 sep. 2016

Abstract
Intellectual property rights (IPRs) have become a key concern for researchers and industry in basically all (high-tech) sectors. IPRs regularly figure prominently in scientific journals and at scientific conferences and lead to dedicated workshops to increase the awareness and “IPR savviness” of scientists. In 2015, Biotechnology Journal published a report from an expert meeting on “Synthetic Biology & Intellectual Property Rights” organized by the Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation sponsored by the European Research Area Network in Synthetic Biology (ERASynBio), in which we provided a number of recommendations for a variety of stakeholders. The current article offers some deeper reflections about IPRs in Systems Biology (SysBio) resulting from an Expert Meeting funded by another European Research Area Network, ERASysAPP. SysBio involves the interdisciplinary study of biological systems at a so called systems level, which is increasingly relevant for both both tratditional and synthetic biology. The meeting brought together experts and stakeholders from systems biology (SysBio) from different countries to discuss emerging challenges and opportunities at the interface of SysBio and IPRs. This article reflects on a number of particularly relevant issues that were discussed at the meeting and offers some first recommendations.

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